Connect with us
Like Homeschool.com on Facebook Follow Homeschool.com on Twitter Pin Homeschool.com on Pinterest Add Homeschool.com on Google+ Visit Our Homeschooling Forum Visit Our Youtube Channel
Homeschool.com, the #1 homeschooling community.  We help you take learning from Ordinary to Extraordinary!
| More
space

Homeschool.com Homepage
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

SOS

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
PennyJ5 View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 01/Sep/2011
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PennyJ5 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: SOS
    Posted: 02/Sep/2011 at 12:57pm
Hi!  I just joined.  I am in need of help.  My 6th grader is using SOS and this is his 1st year homeschooling.  He has ADHD and struggles with reading comprehension.  He is reading at a 5th grade level.   We started Aug. 1, so we have been doing this for a month.  He is behind on assignments and is doing very poorly on quizzes and  tests.  We are working 9:30 to 4 most days with a couple breaks and lunch.  I am exhausted by 4 and I know he is too.  How can I help him?  I thought about removing some assignments, but I am so afraid I won't teach him something he is going to need.  I just don't know how to deal with this.
Back to Top
Darci View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 21/Sep/2011
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Darci Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21/Sep/2011 at 8:11pm
Hi Penny. My son is in 4th grade this year and ADHD. Reading comprehension is a serious problem for him as well. I end up going back through most of the reading with him. Both reading and writing assignments are really difficult, so our days end up being as long as 8 to 5 pretty frequently (see? your day is not so long after all :) ). I relate to being worn out..how long is too long, I wonder?

This is only my second year homeschooling him and it has been quite a struggle. All the while we are trying to find a medication that will slow him down enough so he can concentrate and do his work. Last year, I tried adjusting the schedule and staggering classes to make the days shorter - but he was in school all the way to July 1 just to finish. I really don't want to go that long this year - it was like we hardly had a summer vacation.

So, I relate to your problem at least. I can at least say that I have definitely seen some improvement in his reading comprehension since starting homeschool last year, maybe because we have been actively working on it - as opposed to public school which was mostly about survival for him, not learning. Regardless of the problems, he is really learning a lot and clearly enjoys parts of the day. This is what warms my heart and keeps me going.
Back to Top
HistoryMom View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 23/Mar/2009
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1167
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoryMom Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25/Sep/2011 at 8:47am
Originally posted by PennyJ5 PennyJ5 wrote:

Hi!  I just joined.  I am in need of help.  My 6th grader is using SOS and this is his 1st year homeschooling.  He has ADHD and struggles with reading comprehension.  He is reading at a 5th grade level.   We started Aug. 1, so we have been doing this for a month.  He is behind on assignments and is doing very poorly on quizzes and  tests.  We are working 9:30 to 4 most days with a couple breaks and lunch.  I am exhausted by 4 and I know he is too.  How can I help him?  I thought about removing some assignments, but I am so afraid I won't teach him something he is going to need.  I just don't know how to deal with this.


I am sorry that I didn't see this sooner. Very often LESS is MORE!!! If you are having to spend that long homeschooling, you are doing way too much. It sounds like your intuition is telling you that - most likely any assignment you are thinking of cutting can be. These days, EVERYONE has gaps because our knowledge base is so huge. If he is progressing in his reading and math, those are the two biggies. And it is perfectly fine to start at whatever level he is. But dont' try to kill yourselves "catching up." You have time on your side unless you are certain he is going back to school soon.

It is also possible that the SOS isn't a good fit with him. I have only a little experience using it but from comments it is one of those choices that works well for some and not at all for others. I know you probably spent bucks on it but if you are still struggling as much as when you posted, it may be time to make a change of some kind - whether to really tweak the SOS or ditch it and try another approach.

~Karen in NC
Back to Top
Cathy Pelzmann View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 18/Nov/2011
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cathy Pelzmann Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/Nov/2011 at 11:38am
Hi, 

I am Cathy Pelzmann a special education teacher working with several home school families, and I am very sympathetic and interested in what parents face when they are in this situation. In my own situation, we are driving hours a day to have our children in a charter school in another county.  The driving has become a huge drain and we are considering home schooling since I am already teaching other people's kids.  One of my daughters has ADHD and I am concerned about working with her myself.  She does work well with me in short bursts but I am not sure what an all day session would do to our relationship.  I am wondering if anyone has ideas about this.  Has homeschooling helped with your child's focusing?

I do have some ideas that might help with test preparation.  It's real important to make sure your child is interested in the topic.  Ask questions before jumping into the initial reading:  What does your child already know about the topic?  What do you know that you can share?  Let's say the subject is volcanoes.  Has your family seen a documentary about volcanoes? It's extremely important to connect new material to what your child already knows.  This simple step can dramatically increase comprehension.  This step can be done very quickly.

Then ask, "What would you like to learn about volcanoes?"  The response may be silly:  "Can a volcano fall down after the lava pours out?"  Even if you know the answer, hold onto it.  Just say, "Let's read and find out." Introduce special vocabulary by writing the words on index cards (you can do this in advance) and simply point to the card when the word comes up.  Your child can read the card aloud and the short definition and then continue with the text.  Pictures are great if you can think of an illustration for vocabulary words.  

If your son is below grade level, you will want to help with the readings. Even if he can read alone, it is a good idea to start the reading together so you can build interest.  Your tone of voice and pace of your reading (speeding up and slowing down) can pull him into an active listening state. At that point hand the book to him and let him continue.  Sometimes you will have to paraphrase difficult material and explain it in simpler words.

I always advise parents to write in the books.  Underline, highlight, and make notes in the margin.  Marking up a book is one of the best ways to make the material your own.   In any case, having study notes right in a book can solve a lot of problems for a child with ADHD.  Stop and summarize main ideas.  It's the act of putting information in one's own words that helps with processing and remembering.  Do this in a conversational way.

As you do the reading, it is a good idea to have practice test questions handy.  Stop and answer the questions as you go.  Instead of writing the questions out and breaking up the flow of the reading, just highlight the answer on the page. Then on your list of questions, put the page number where the answer is found.

I hope this helps!

Cathy

Back to Top
Darci View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 21/Sep/2011
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Darci Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19/Nov/2011 at 7:43pm
As I mentioned earlier, I am in my second year of homeschooling my son, and I can see huge improvement in his reading comprehension. I imagine it is a combination of factors. First, I go over a lot of the reading with him, discussing it and relating it to what he's already learned and already knows from experiences outside of school. This makes the information relevant and interesting to him, and seems to commit it to memory very well.

One of the first things I noticed last year when he would read aloud, he would skip over a lot of words and thereby lose the meaning of the sentence. I had him practice many times slowing down and reading every single word in the sentence.




Back to Top
mayla View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 11/Mar/2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mayla Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Mar/2012 at 6:49am
I can understand your struggles. I myself have decided to homeschool my 2nd grader because a regular school he has been to had too much distraction to let him focus on his school work. As a result, he became so left behind that affected his grades. 
Throughout our sessions though, I make sure to put breaks as needed especially when he appears distracted and allow him to sit on an exercise ball whenever he feels the need to move around while he's reading. Maybe a bit of classical music might help your child to stimulate what they have studied or else make sure he's on earplugs if he easily gets distracted by the noise outside.
Ultimately, experimentation does help. It's but normal to find the right mix for successfully homeschooling our ADHD kids. This article here encourages us on ways to positively teach kids with ADHD/ADD.


Through trial and error on finding the best home environment, curriculum and social activities for our children, we might just be able to find a winning setup for them and for ourselves. I wish us all the best of luck! :)
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.148 seconds.

   
 

© Copyright, 2014 Homeschool.com, Inc. All rights reserved.
Web Hosting by Midtown Micro, Inc.