Connect with us
Like Homeschool.com on Facebook Follow Homeschool.com on Twitter Pin Homeschool.com on Pinterest Add Homeschool.com on Google+ Visit Our Homeschooling Forum Visit Our Youtube Channel
Homeschool.com, the #1 homeschooling community.  We help you take learning from Ordinary to Extraordinary!
| More
space

Homeschool.com Homepage
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Following Directions/Spacey Kid

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
kheicksen View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 02/Nov/2011
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 2
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kheicksen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Following Directions/Spacey Kid
    Posted: 02/Nov/2011 at 4:23pm
I was wondering if you could offer some suggestions. We are taking part in a home based k12 charter school in which I am the "learning coach" (which really means the teacher).  My 6 yr old daughter is a smart and, in some ways, an advanced kid but has always had trouble paying attention and following directions. Her mind wanders when I am speaking and quite often it is obvious she hasn't heard a word I have said. Lately the problem has gotten much worse and we are wasting 3-4 hours a day just trying to get her to follow simple directions that have nothing to do with her ability to comprehend the lesson itself. I try to get her to repeat my directions back to me and she either can't or wont. I use reward stars for good behavior (like being a good listener and following directions) and if she does not follow directions twice in a row I have her writing 5 times, "I listen and follow directions." She loses her free time if she uses up the day not following directions. None of this is working though and I just can't seem to get her listen no matter what. Even getting her to write her name and the date on the top of her page is a major battle every day. I think this is important just in case I don't have the option to have her home always and she eventually is out in "the real world." Plus its just the principle of the matter. I have her go back and check her work and even then, she will not actually read back what she has written, but will say something else. Its like she is completely disconnected from reality. Its not just one subject either. The problem crops up at different times and for different subjects. Sometimes its with new material and sometimes its with review stuff that she was working fabulously with the day before. Her four year old brother is far better at listening and following directions than she is, so I don't think its an age thing.  I am beyond frustrated and at my whits end. Please help!
Back to Top
TheAssistant View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 10/Oct/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 19
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TheAssistant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/Nov/2011 at 6:16pm
It could be that she's distracted or fidgety. Maybe try moving to a different area while you do school? Could writing out the directions instead of telling them to her help?
Back to Top
krysoco View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 02/Sep/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 9
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote krysoco Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28/Nov/2011 at 9:30am
You could also make sure that she is getting enough sleep and watching her
diet. Specifically eliminate red dye which is in a lot of food. I don't know if
its doable but breaking up curriculum into chunks thruout the day. If you
notice that her attention wanders after, lets say, 20 min., then do 20 min.
learning sessions. Allowing her the play w/manipulatives asso. w/the lesson
while listening to you also. HTH
Back to Top
themadmax View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 30/Jan/2012
Location: Altus, OK
Status: Offline
Points: 3
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote themadmax Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30/Jan/2012 at 11:11am
We have a  9yo boy with similar issues.  Here is what we have found helps (your mileage may vary):
1) Relax. Defuse the situation and rid yourself of the anxiety about this.  Your daughter will turn out fine; she has the best, most concerned teacher a kid could ever have.
2) Cut back on sugar (including OJ), especially before school and before bed.
3) Quietly play some background music (classical is good) while they are working (ties up that creative portion of the brain and keeps it from hijacking the concentration portion).  This also helps with the sleepwalkers/sleeptalkers in our family.
4) Fiddlesticks.  Or anything else that can occupy her hands while listening.  Doodling is another outlet.  Much like music, this can make an amazing difference.
5) Coffee.  Counter-intuitive, perhaps, but we have had good success with giving the dynamo a half cup of it with breakfast.  No sugar (see #2), but a little milk and a cup like Daddy's makes it a popular item. 
6) Baby steps.  If she can work for 20 minute (as krysoco says above), then do 20 minutes and reward her with a short but active break. Build the time gradually. Remember, kids are basically energy wrapped in skin that needs to be tamed. 
7) Relax.  You are doing a great job, just by being there with her.  It will be OK.
Back to Top
EricaAnn View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 06/Feb/2012
Location: Floresville
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EricaAnn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/Feb/2012 at 12:04pm
That is good advice. I have the same issue with my 5 year old.  She is a ball of energy like any other kid.  I have found that shorter yet frequent sessions work best. Dont forget stickers, those little rewards make all the difference and foster motivation. 
Back to Top
HomeMomOf3 View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 05/Feb/2012
Location: California
Status: Offline
Points: 6
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HomeMomOf3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/Apr/2012 at 12:37pm
My first post :)  I will second the suggestion on diet, we started focusing on fresh fruit and veggies and our son showed a noticeable improvement in just overall activity levels.  I would imagine that it could effect concentration/figetyness
Back to Top
onyxravnos View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie
Avatar

Joined: 11/Mar/2008
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 73
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote onyxravnos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04/Jun/2012 at 7:42pm
If she can read I agree on the idea of writing the directions rather then telling them to her.
You could also try a work box type system.  Place her work for the day in folders or boxes and she can do them whenever she likes during the day as long as she gets it all done by X time. ( lunch \ dinner \ bed \ whatever)  Maybe giving her the freedom to choose to do the work may help.
Back to Top
libtea View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 11/Jun/2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote libtea Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/Jun/2012 at 8:29am
Sometimes bright kids have clever ways of asserting their autonomy - especially if they really want to be good.

Instead of talking back and defiantly refusing to work, maybe she's dragging her feet.  It's like a passive aggressive work-stoppage. Making sure kids can safely express their distaste for something is important. Let her tell you all about how she doesn't want to work -  listen, listen, listen, then thank her for expressing her feelings and then tell her to get back to work for 10 minutes. Then you can take a break and do something she really wants to do with you - something were she's in charge for a little while. She wants to bond with you. Make sure you're able to inspire lots of eye contact and smiles.

Also, sleep and magnesium are worth looking into for improving attention.

One last thing, if you have an older homeschool friend to have some study sessions with, it might really help her to see how a kid gets work done fast and effectively. The power of copy cat, modeling is amazing.



Edited by libtea - 11/Jun/2012 at 8:32am
Back to Top
fbnewtz View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 21/Jul/2012
Location: Houston
Status: Offline
Points: 2
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fbnewtz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21/Jul/2012 at 3:54am
I agree with all of the above.  Have you done a learning style test on her?  It is harder for the little ones to take, but sometimes you are just not reaching them with the right medium and they are not wired properly to pay attention. 

I think diet is very key.  Robinson Curriculum has a good article on removing sugar from the diet.  I know with my ADD I have to be doing two things at once to pick things up.  It is imperative.
Back to Top
Blessings2all View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie
Avatar

Joined: 17/Feb/2012
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 26
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Blessings2all Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27/Jul/2012 at 8:05pm
I have an ADD child and we heard that it can be tied to allergies to dairy and/or wheat and/or artificial food colorings.  We dropped all three from her diet for a few weeks and saw an improvement.  Then we tried adding one in at a time and discovered that for sure, dairy is the culprit.  Quitting dairy also eliminated her acne.  We also leave artificial stuff alone.

As for the problems with listening, you might try these activities for improving listening skills.

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.156 seconds.

   
 

© Copyright, 2014 Homeschool.com, Inc. All rights reserved.
Web Hosting by Midtown Micro, Inc.