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K12???

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Mombie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 16/Dec/2011 at 8:05am
I hope I'm posting this in the right place.. my apologies if not! 

Has anyone heard of or used the program k12?
(http://www.k12.com/schools-programs/online-public-schools)
apparently, it's a virtual online charter school..

you see, we've recently decided that we're going to home school..but what method we're going to go with has yet to be decided.

I feel like I favor traditional homeschooling a little more.. I like the idea of being able to choose the curriculum, and go at our own pace..
where as my husband wants something a little more..strict?
he completely wants our children to be home schooled, but he wants guidelines to follow, set curriculum, tests, and written acknowledgment (from the state?) that they are where they're supposed to be academically.
I mean, I can see where he's coming from (I guess) in regards to ensuring our children are up to par, and no questions can be asked when college comes around..

so apparently, k12 is an online public school.. all the curriculum is chosen for you, a teacher is assigned to your child, all the material is sent to you, because it's funded through the public school system its free, and at the end of each year is a standardized test to graduate your child to the next grade.

if you've used this program, how did it work for you? what does it consist of?
opinions? thoughts? anyone?

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elliemaejune View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote elliemaejune Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/Dec/2011 at 9:01am

Here's the thing:

You can buy K12 yourself and use it privately as a homeschooler. I have heard mostly good reviews about it when it is used that way. In a sense, it is no different than ABeka, BJUP, or any other publisher, except that most of its "materials" are computer based.

You can also enroll in a government-funded, home-based public school. In some states they are charter schools (I don't know if this is true in all states or not; it is so in California). Some of these programs will use computer/Internet-based instruction, some use textbooks; some provide/require K12, some provide others (at least one offers Calvert).

All of these schools have actual names, such as Connections Academy. K12 is just the name of the instructional materials; it is not the name of the school

So, K12 is NOT an on-line public school. Connections Academy is. If you enroll your children in Connections Academy (to use that as an example; it may be a different school where you live; in California, it's California Virtual Academy--CAVA) the curriculum is not "chosen for you;" it is required that all students use the same thing.

"Graduation" only occurs at the end of 12 years.

Children enrolled in such programs are considered public school students, not homeschooled students.

I almost never recommend government-funded programs like this. If people want to homeschool, I can help them with that, because I believe that private homeschooling is, in most cases, the best thing for children. Public-school-at-home does not have the same freedom that homeschooling does. And IMHO, it's a way for public schools to suck parents in and have control over their children in a way that it is not possible when the parents homeschool.

Thousands of homeschooled graduates are accepted at colleges, including major, Ivy League colleges, all the time with nothing except parent-generated transcripts and diplomas (along with ACT/SAT scores or portfolios, if required). Enrolling your children in a public-school-at-home does not mean your children will have an easier time entering college than if you did it all yourself.

Your dh should look at state laws (especially the ones in the state where you live). You may live in one of the several states that are considered "green" because there is no oversight by the state in any way regarding homeschooled students. A few states require homeschooled children to be evaluated by a third party; several require standardized testing annually/semi-annually with results submitted to the school district or whoever, but the state doesn't usually give written acknowledgement that the children are where they "should" be. Most states don't required standardized test scores to be submitted to anyone, and those that do don't put anything in writing as far as approval or acknowledgement.

There are many distance-learning schools that require testing and whatnot. If you want to homeschool, I would recommend one of those (and keep my fingers crossed that your dh will learn to have faith in you and feel less need to depend on outsiders to determine how your children are being educated) over a public-school-at-home any time. I would also strongly recommend that y'all attend a homeschool convention next year, one with good workshops, so that both of you can be better informed regarding homeschooling.

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Mombie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mombie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/Dec/2011 at 9:28am
Thank you! Just the reply I was hoping for!

I don't know if we're necessarily doubting our abilities to home school. I think the unknown is kind of nerve wracking, and I just don't want to fail at this!

What I would *like* is a little structure, that I can be flexible with and make my own. (such as a set curriculum that we can do at our own pace, add and remove things, etc) I'd also like a safety net of some sort, where if we do run into a problem/need help, we'll have the resources. (I suppose I could always hire a tutor, though?)

I suppose it's a good thing I'm looking into this really early on. I want to know as much as possible, and be prepared and confident, when the time comes, you know? (we all have to start somewhere, right?)

I will most definitely attend a convention/workshop!!
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Mombie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mombie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/Dec/2011 at 9:37am
I should add that I really don't have a lot of support or information resources, so I'm learning how to do this the right way all alone.

My parents are teachers, and you would think that they would be willing to help, but they're completely against our choice to home school. So aside from this forum, and google searches, all I'm hearing is how this is the "wrong choice" and "why I should just send my children to public school."

I know in my heart home schooling is right for us, so even if this might be "difficult and complicated" I'm 100% determined!!



Bear with me, y'all! I promise to catch on soon!
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elliemaejune View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote elliemaejune Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/Dec/2011 at 10:11am

Oh, most teachers are totally opposed to homeschooling. They are offended that parents might have the audacity to--GASP--teach their own children!! Oh the horror!!!

I don't remember if we've discussed which state you live in, so I can give you the link to the homeschool laws (if any; some don't have homeschool laws per se; they have court cases -- California, Illinois, Texas--or just vague compulsory attendance laws--New Jersey). I also don't remember if you mentioned how old your dc are (and I'm too lazy to go look it up if you did ). Those two things can make a lot of decisions for you right off the bat.

A couple of resources you might not have found yet:

Ambleside OnLine: A Charlotte Mason site that maps out what to teach each year; mostly uses good trade books (books you'd find in the library or a bookstore, as opposed to textbooks; this is a good term for you to toss around with your teacher parents  ) for history and science and whatnot.

The Well Trained Mind--forum for folks who have read and like the methodology in "The Well Trained Mind," although lots of others (like me) hang out there, too.

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