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Jenneve View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Konos?
    Posted: 03/Feb/2007 at 1:45pm

I'm new to this forum. I just found it today. I'm wondering if anyone has used Konos and if you would like to share some information about it. We are currently using My Father's World curriculum, but I'm thinking about switching to Konos for next year. The problem is, I don't really know much about it. From looking at the website, it looks very hands-on, which is what I am looking for. I'm wondering how difficult and time consuming the lesson planning is. I've never done any lesson planning since My Father's World comes with the lesson plans already done. I'm a bit nervous about that. I'm also wondering how Konos is used. What is a typical day like? I'm planning on using Volume 1 with all 3 of my kids (all boys ages 5, 6, & 8 by the time we'll use it). How does that work exactly? As you can see, I'm a little confused and I would really appreciate some feedback/advice. Thank you so much!

 

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03/Feb/2007 at 2:26pm

You can make KONOS as time consuming as you want :-)

It doesn't have to be that way, though. When I used KONOS, I could plan a month's worth of activities on a Sunday evening.

What worked best for me was to do two KONOS days a week (Tuesday and Thursday). Some people can do a few activities each day, but I guess I'm a little more OCD than that, lol.

If you have lots of time for planning, then you choose activities which need lots of materials or whatever that you don't have around the house, or which require library books. If you don't have lots of time for planning, then choose activities which do NOT require library books or lots of materials (and MOST activities do not). All of the library books are optional; if you want to get some, do. If not, don't.

Some time in the spring (and KONOS assumes that you'll be doing it beginning in the fall), I would sit down two or three evenings (or however long it took) and read through the whole book, checking off, in pencil, the things which looked interesting. In July or August, I decided which character trait I was going to start in September (and I followed the line up in the book), and read through that character trait again. I'd choose exactly which sub-units I was going to do, knowing that I was doing that character trait two days a week for a month (or two; there are 7 character traits in Vol. 1, I believe, so you will do a couple of them for two months instead of 1). Finally, knowing what my schedule for the month was probably going to be (church activities, doctors' appointments, etc.) I read through the activities I had checkmarked and put a second check by the activities I *knew* could do, especially if they needed outside resources.

I used KONOS before the lesson plans were written; I don't think they're really very good, and I usually recommend ignoring them altogether.

I also recommend taking your volume of KONOS to Kinko's and have the spine cut off, and the book drilled for three holes so it will fit in a three-ring notebook (take the notebook with you to model). Remove the lesson plans and toss :-) Put the rest in a big three-ring notebook, and the character trait you're working on in another, smaller notebook. Now it will be easy to handle.

Questions?

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/Feb/2007 at 3:58pm

Hi Jenneve,

First of all, everthing you read on the Konos website is true. The way the Hulcey's decribe their Unit studies is the REAL!

I want to encourage you to join the Konos Yahoo group.

There are some wonderful Konos mentors on that board that will be a good source of info for you.

Unlike Elliemaejune, I thought the lesson plans were excellent. Just goes to show you that no two families homeschool alike. But I may have had a more recent edition of Konos.

I'm wondering how difficult and time consuming the lesson planning is. I've never done any lesson planning since My Father's World comes with the lesson plans already done. I'm a bit nervous about that.

You can spend as much or as little time on a topic as YOU WANT. Konos makes the planning easy. All you need to do is sit down with Volume 1, and decide which unit looks the most FUN.Read through the weekly plans, and the pages of suggested activities. Decide which ones will be the most FUN. Gather the stuff you need like empty refrigerator boxes, library books, movies, hammers, nails, aluminum foil, string, duct tape etc. Don't worry, Konos lists everything you need and the  how-to INSTRUCTIONS.

Each Volume contains several Units. Each unit is divided into sub units. Each sub unit contains daily lesson plans for 3 grade levels. Young K-2nd, middle  3rd-5th and older 6th-8th. The lesson plans are not as detailed as MW, but there are so many suggested activities and assignments to choose from, you have the freedom and flexibility to choose the ones you and your kids would get the most out of.Topics are not grade level specific, so you can choose one unit study for all 3 of your boys.

 I'm also wondering how Konos is used. What is a typical day like? I'm planning on using Volume 1 with all 3 of my kids (all boys ages 5, 6, & 8 by the time we'll use it). How does that work exactly? As you can see, I'm a little confused and I would really appreciate some feedback/advice. Thank you so much!

Volume 1 is a great place to start!

Jessica Hulcey, the creator of Konos, suggests doing the 3 R's in the morning, and Konos in the afternoon, when the boys are at their wiggliest. She knows how to put their energy to good use!

Two of the 3 R's can come right out of your unit study.  But Konos does not include Math, so you're on your own there.

 Here is a typical Konos day:

 We would begin the day with Math. Then onto our Language Arts. This would include one of the suggested reading books like Helen Keller ,from the unit study "Attentiveness" for example. From this book, we would pull spelling words, vocabulary, parts of speech,and a writing assignment.(These are all found in the lesson plans, from a wide variety of suggestions, per grade level) My dd wrote a report on the causes of deafness.

Then we'd have lunch.

After lunch we would immerse ourselves into our chosen project from the unit.The list of projects and everything you'll need to do them are listed in the back section of the weekly lesson plans.There are TONS of suggestions, and YOU and your kids choose which ones you want to do.

 For example, while we were in the Attentiveness Unit, working on the sub unit of the sense of hearing, my daughter learned all about the ear. She constructed a crawl through model of the ear in our living room, using furniture, sheets, and assorted household and garage objects. ( an extension cord for the auditory nerve, a shell for the cochlea, a toy stirrup from a stuffed horse for the stirrup, etc).  Later that evening, she took us on a guided Ear Tour. She was demonstrating what she had learned! It was so fun and so much more worthwhile than a fill in the blank worksheet on the anatomy of the ear!  This is a typical Konos day.

The activities can be as simple or complicated as you want! Sometimes, we'd pick a lengthy project, and work on it for a week or two . For example, while learning about the early Explorers, from the "Inquisitive Unit", my daughter made a replica of a Viking ship with balsa wood.  Meanwhile,we read Leif the Lucky  , and at co-op the older kids traced his route on a huge world map made of colored chalk out in the cul-de-sac. Our co-op's little kids, dressed as Vikings, piled in a wagon ship and set sail.The science lessons were on early navigation with the constellations. The kids posed as their favorite ones. We made tin can constellations, and went star gazing.

Homeschooling with Konos became a lifestyle. Our family would search out things to do together that complimented the Unit study, like stargazing at the Astronomer's Club telescope demonstration. Many, many times, we saw God's hand. How could I know the Astronomers Club were going to have a demo, just at the time we were learning about constellations??

I hope this helps.Changing curriculum is a big decision.

Happy Homeschooling!

Lynn

 

 

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/Feb/2007 at 5:31pm
I was thinking of using KONOS for my two children and was wondering if the timelines are necessary.  I would love to use them but my space is limited.  What about the compass?  Do you really need it.  From what  I have read on reviews and the KONOS site it sounds like that most of the info in the compass is background information on the program.  But I might have misunderstood.  Please let me know if you are expereinced with these items.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/Feb/2007 at 8:09pm

Originally posted by used2teach used2teach wrote:

I was thinking of using KONOS for my two children and was wondering if the timelines are necessary.  I would love to use them but my space is limited.  What about the compass?  Do you really need it.  From what  I have read on reviews and the KONOS site it sounds like that most of the info in the compass is background information on the program.  But I might have misunderstood.  Please let me know if you are expereinced with these items.

Yes, you definitely need the timelines.

No, you do NOT need the Compass.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07/Feb/2007 at 4:07pm
Wow! Thanks for all that great information, ladies! It just confirms for me that KONOS is probably the right fit for my family. Lynn, the activities you mentioned are exactly the kinds of things I'm looking for. I've joined the Konos yahoo group and I hope to learn a lot from the ladies there. I'm getting excited to get my copy of Volume 1 and start looking through it!

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/Feb/2007 at 9:38am
The people I know who did Konos were very busy. You definitely cannot do more than one level at a time. It is best if you can find someone to do it with you as it is very time consuming and has a lot of teacher prep. The people who did Konos seemed to like it. But, they were the high energy kind of people. I thought the curriculum looked fine, it just was not for me as I have 4 children whose ages are very spread a part. It does not include English or Math or spelling or handwriting. Basically..it does not include the basics. Konos is really a science and history curriculum. I still think it looks good. It would be worth a try if you have the time and energy. It is filled with lots of great activities.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/Feb/2007 at 12:44pm

Originally posted by summer70 summer70 wrote:

The people I know who did Konos were very busy. You definitely cannot do more than one level at a time. It is best if you can find someone to do it with you as it is very time consuming and has a lot of teacher prep. The people who did Konos seemed to like it. But, they were the high energy kind of people. I thought the curriculum looked fine, it just was not for me as I have 4 children whose ages are very spread a part. It does not include English or Math or spelling or handwriting. Basically..it does not include the basics. Konos is really a science and history curriculum. I still think it looks good. It would be worth a try if you have the time and energy. It is filled with lots of great activities.

It is true that many people are very busy when they do KONOS, but that is their choice. KONOS is only as time consuming, and requires on ly as much teacher prep, as people want it to be. I planned a whole month's worth of KONOS activities on a Sunday evening and did KONOS two days a week with my dds, by myself.

And the authors, Jessican Hulcey and Carole Thaxton, will tell you that KONOS is ideal for multiple ages of children; in fact, they purposely wrote it to be that way. The rule of thumb is that you teach to the oldest child and let the younger ones come along.

KONOS does teach the basics--the basics of history and science. You need something else for the basics of English and math :-)

My only regret with KONOS is that I started hsing before it was written so I wasn't able to use all three volumes :-)

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/Feb/2007 at 6:37pm
Originally posted by elliemaejune elliemaejune wrote:

 

It is true that many people are very busy when they do KONOS, but that is their choice. KONOS is only as time consuming, and requires on ly as much teacher prep, as people want it to be. I planned a whole month's worth of KONOS activities on a Sunday evening and did KONOS two days a week with my dds, by myself.

And the authors, Jessican Hulcey and Carole Thaxton, will tell you that KONOS is ideal for multiple ages of children; in fact, they purposely wrote it to be that way. The rule of thumb is that you teach to the oldest child and let the younger ones come along.

KONOS does teach the basics--the basics of history and science. You need something else for the basics of English and math

 

I never said that it being very busy and having a lot of work is bad. I just feel this is a fact about Konos that someone should know going in to it. This may very well be exactly what someone is looking for. I also never said I did not like Konos, I just said it was not for me. BUT, the basics are generally reading, 'riting, and 'rithmetic. I was refering to the basics of academics. It would be insane to list all the basics it covers and not covers. The original poster needs to know that she will still need to cover reading, writing, and arithmetic. Otherwise, she will purchase Konos and go to get started with her year and then realize she still needs to go back and purchase the other stuff.



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/Feb/2007 at 8:46pm

Is it possible to do Konos without doing the New Testament Bible? I love the idea of tons of activities  and using stories to teach but we don't follow the New Testament and I was wondering if it was do-able without those stories?

Mia

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Feb/2007 at 7:04am

Yes, My friend has 6 children and finds that Konos allowes her to accomodate all their levels and learning styles. It actually makes homeschool do-able for their family!

Yes, it is possible to do Konos without using the New Testament.

Remember, Konos is not a "prescribed" curriculum. It offers many, many suggestions to make homeschooling your children a wonderful adventure in learning. Konos makes homeschooling a lifestyle, which is what sets it apart from and above the rest of the text book or liturature based curriculums.

"The original poster needs to know that she will still need to cover reading, writing, and arithmetic. Otherwise, she will purchase Konos and go to get started with her year and then realize she still needs to go back and purchase the other stuff"

You will need Math, in addition to Konos.

The "other stuff" I purchased sat on the book shelf because when I tried to use it, it not only took time away from the good stuff my child was learning with Konos, it was also redundant.

Why did she need to complete a worksheet to underline the verbs and circle the nouns when we had just sorted through nouns and verbs using my kitchen utensil drawer.( Only a Konos family will "get this")

We found Konos rich in Language Arts- The book suggestions are age appropriate and relevant to the topic of study.The Vocabulary ,Spelling  and Grammar come from your child's own writing and the literature they are reading, the writing assignment suggestions pertain to the topics of study and/or the literature and IT ALL goes along with the unit study. This approach makes it relevant and therefore meaningful to your children. When it is meaningful, they remember!

Yes, it is time consuming, but it is SO worthwhile!

 Baking chocolate chip cookies from scratch is time consumimg too, but when it is something you have chosen to do, then you have decided that it is worth your time and effort. And the reward becomes intrinsic, rather than a gold star or check mark for task completion. Homeschooling just does not have to be about progressing through the curriculum!

Read this about how children learn and you'll get SO excited:

 

How We Teach Changes Brain Size

Does how we teach our children physically change their brains and the way in which their brains are wired? In her book entitled Endangered Minds: Why Children Don't Think and What We Can Do About It, Jane M. Healy, Ph. D., relates experimental findings which compare the brain size of three groups of rats. The three groups of rats had identical food, water, and cages, except the 'enriched rats' were given all kinds of stimuli with which to experiment. The second set of rats merely watched the first group of rats interact with the stimuli, while the third group of rats was kept in another room without any stimuli and without any stimulated rats to watch. The results of this experiment found that increased environmental enrichment created 'brains that were larger and heavier, with increased dendritic branching,' which meant better communication from nerve cell to nerve cell.

Experiences create concepts

Dr. Shirley O'Rourke, an education analyst and a public school kindergarten teacher, affirmed the importance of experiences when she commented to Healy, 

'Without experiences, there are no concepts; without concepts, there's
no attention span, because they [the students] don't know what people 
are talking about.' 

Dr. O'Rourke laments that today's children come to school with fewer social skills, less language ability, less ability to listen, and less motor ability than in years past. 'Years ago the children had experiences, their parents took them places, they talked to them instead of at them, they read to them . . . But today . . . what some adults seem to be calling experiences is to go buy a workbook,' concludes O'Rourke.

Units + experiences = excited learning

Whatever does rat research have to do with teaching home school children the basics? My answer, "EVERYTHING!!" If we want a child to be an excellent writer and reader, we first start with hands-on experiences that build concepts and hold the child's attention. Because home schoolers have fewer than 20 kids per class, hands-on experiences are more do-able than in a classroom. Further, since home schools have only one teacher, mom, it is possible to integrate all academic subjects into a unit. The unit studies method intertwines hands-on experiences with the unit's reading and writing, locking the child's mind on the wavelength of the unit thereby increasing retention, since all subjects are interrelated. How much easier it is for a child, while studying Medieval times, to write about the parts of a castle if he has just built one out of appliance boxes and labeled the parts with index cards; or, while studying animal classification, for him to write a report on the starfish, that he has not only dissected, but dressed up as, and acted out! The unit approach never requires children to write about unrelated subjects out of the blue. Rather, it allows children to write about the subject in which they are immersed.

Starfish costume cut out of bedding foam egg crates bought for $5.00 from Wal-Mart.  Child laid down on foam and drawn around. Next cut out both sides and face hole, then stapled front and back together.  

Messes Build Brains

I recently received an email from a woman who loved the hands-on approach for her children but was married to a clean-freak, Felix Unger-type. While the mother wanted the children to set up a model ear under the dining room table that they could crawl through, the father preferred the children fill in many pages of workbooks. To him, messiness was non-learning despite the fact that research indicates learning and retention increase when experiential activities are added.

Fortunately, the mothers of Thomas Edison, the Wright brothers and Teddy Roosevelt allowed their young boys' genius to develop amid a mess. These mothers' tolerance of messes netted the twentieth century the light bulb, the airplane, and a U.S. President. I am convinced that the Yankee ingenuity of yesterday has been stifled today by adults' compulsion for children to fill in workbook blanks neatly! Do you want kids with bigger brains? It's simple - allow numerous messy experiences to stimulate small brains and weave all of your literature, history, science, and writing into one focused unit. 
TA-DAH! Bigger brains. 

 

 

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Feb/2007 at 7:16am

 PS Go to the Konos message board for tried and true advice from those who are actually using Konos. The database is AMAZING! I have not seen any  other's as thourough and complete. It adresses large families,

Only child, multiple ages, learning disabilities: ADHD, Dyslexia, Autism, gifted child, preschool/toddler, Right Brained Learner, Transition from Traditional School, Transition from Workbooks, School with Mother's Illness, School on the Move
Suggestions from KONOSers: Back to School Ideas, Chores, How to Start KONOS, How to Plan, How much prep time, planner suggestions, sample schedules, organize home, First Day with KONOS reports


Answers common questions for units; favorite resources; favorite activities; Links per unit can be found on the LINKS page

And TONS more!

 

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Feb/2007 at 9:10am
I want to make sure I was clear on this..I think Konos looks gresat. I have looked at it up close and spent time with friend's who do it. *I* am just not that energetic or organized. IF I had a friend to do it with or a coop, I would be more likely to do it.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Feb/2007 at 2:21pm

Timelines and Compass

We love the time line wall chart. It can be hung like a shower curtain if space is limited. I tried the strips at first, errgh, what a head ache-I am too dyslexic for all those strips and sticky tape and left to right directionality involved in setting it up. The wall chart is wonderful for people like me- all in one piece, simply attach the rings and hang it up!

Now that we have had it awhile, I really appreciate it's reinforcement value, for ME as much as my student. Whenever I have one of those days when self doubt creeps in and I wonder if we are doing enough, I'll look at the time line and all those funny little guys are reminders of the amount of schooling we have accomplished!

Best of all, she can pull one off the chart and tell us all about him.

The Compass is a good resource if you want to create a transcript or of you want to keep on track with grade level requirements for your state.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Feb/2007 at 4:59pm

I love all this information! I've ordered volume 1 and am so excited about getting it in soon! I don't mind taking the time to plan my lessons. That's why I'm looking into it/ordering now so that I can have the summer to work on it. I also don't mind taking the time with my kids to do everything. IMO, that's part of the beauty of KONOS. It gives me & my kids ideas of fun things to do together and they will be learning at the same time. Ingenious! 

And yes, I know I will need to add the 3r's to the curriculum. I've already been looking into that as well.

  

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Feb/2007 at 8:26pm

How does Konos compare to story of the world? I know in story you read the book to the kids and there is an activity guide (mixed reviews on that) and Konos uses real books with pictures and everything (big selling point for my kids). Any other differences?

 

Mia

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/Feb/2007 at 5:48am

 

Yes. The Story of the World presents history in chronological order for the elementary grades. The activity guide is a go-along,with maps,coloring pages,  project directions and additional reading and suggestions.

Konos, is history ,science( earth science, biology, chemistry and  physics), language arts( spelling, vocab. grammar, writing),  and art and music appreciation integrated within a topic of study-the unit.

It does not present History in chronological order, although you can easily do this if that's what YOU want. Konos is flexible and allows you meet the educational goals YOU have chosen for your children.There are how to instructions in the data base, as well as the reason why Konos presents a chronolical study of history in high school.

 I encourage you to join the message board, and  access the data base . You'll find lots of info for any type if question you may have about Konos - including suggestions of combining Konos with other curricula.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/KONOS-JessicaHulcy/

Lynn

 

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/Feb/2007 at 7:32pm
I just wanted to know if anyone has had problems with getting on the Konos-JessicaHulcy group.  I filled out all the stuff for it over a week ago and my membership is still pending.  I am really interested in finding out more from users of the Konos curriculum since that is what I am going to use.  Just wanted to know.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/Feb/2007 at 7:56pm

Oh dear, I forgot how long it takes to get on the  Konos board.

In the mean time, here is a response from a Konos mom regarding the question of the chronological appoach to history. I hope you will enjoy it, and glean what is useful for you and yours.

When we began homeschooling in 1987, my husband and I wanted to teach our children in the best way possible. Our convictions and experience led us to adopt a book-centered, rather than text centered, approach in our home that was mindful of the developmental progress of our children. Discussion, writing, fine music and art were important in our daily lives. At that time, I wasn’t aware that there was a term “classical” which encompassed what we believed and how we taught. KONOS provided a good vehicle for me as it allowed me to teach everyone together while still tailoring reading and activities to the individual needs of my children. Over the past few years, “classical” education has become the focal point of much discussion and seems to be the preferred method for homeschooling. However, as I’ve talked with many, many families about homeschooling, I’ve discovered that I need to have folks define what they mean when they ask me what I think of a classical education. Here are the definitions I’ve seen over the years: 1. Following the developmental model of the Trivium, with an emphasis on the written word, reasoning, and written communication at each stage. (This happens to be my personal understanding of classical education.) 2. Using old books that someone has designated “classics”. 3. Using school textbooks from the 19th century exclusively. 4. Following a rigid chronological approach to history. 5. Including Latin and/or Greek in a student’s course work. In recent years, The Well Trained Mind has offered a structure and sequence that many families find appealing. Since I’ve worked with KONOS for so many years, many folks have asked me to compare WTM and KONOS. In so far as WTM utilizes real books instead of textbooks, it is very much in keeping with the classical model. Children learn to read as soon as they are able and books are a natural part of daily life. Reading is a source of pleasure as well as information. Communication is important, with WTM emphasizing early development of writing and composition skills. KONOS also relies on real books for pleasure and information. Communication skills are emphasized through a variety of methods. Dialog is an important component of KONOS. This isn’t the parent standing up delivering information; this is a family model of sharing ideas, seeking clarification, challenging one another’s thinking, and encouraging concise and gracious language. Writing is a part of daily instruction, but younger ones are encouraged to develop their thinking skills with dialog and dramatization while they’re working on their budding writing abilities. The area that concerns me most with the WTM model is the lowering of the age for the grammar stage. In the original contemporary classical model (“The Lost Tools of Learning”) the grammar stage was considered to begin at the age of 9 or so. The Bluedorns advocate this same starting point, I’m happy to say. The WTM, however, would have our 6 yr olds trying to perform at grammar level before it’s developmentally appropriate. In the book Repairing the Ruins , edited by Douglas Wilson, Tom Garfield states, “…grammar elements, once learned, are often best reinforced through the integration of material.” (from an essay entitled “The Trivium Applied in the Elementary) He then goes on to recommend using guided discovery learning, lots of tactile instruction (sensory integration), drama, “hands-on” projects like models and collections, and story-telling. All of these recommended methods are the framework for KONOS! Along with the reading aloud we do and the narration/dialog, the types of activities listed above plus our timeline give a very full and challenging education. What we don’t do is impose note-taking and hours of workbooks on our younger children. By the time they’re moving out of the grammar stage, their KONOS work becomes more strongly oriented toward research. However, hands-on is still a part of the day for many families because these children who are now moving into the dialectic stage will often be found helping younger siblings work through those activities that were so meaningful for them when they were younger. What about chronology? I’m not entirely sure where the idea of a chronological approach as an essential element of classical education came from. I haven’t come across it in reading any of Dorothy Sayers materials or reading in the history of education in classical times. It makes a lot of sense for older children who are ready to think in a linear way. Again, the dialectic stage is the perfect time to move into a chronological approach if you so desire. In fact, at the rhetoric stage, KONOS History of the World offers an excellent approach to chronological study with students reading from primary works and developing thinking and writing skills at a more sophisticated level. However, our young ones learn in a more “integrated” way and they must grow into linear thinking through their experiences with family life (the pattern of our days), reading good literature aloud and silently, and communicating effectively with others. To impose a linear approach and expect them to understand and retain seems pretty futile. We do help our young ones get oriented to the linear nature of history, though, by using a very graphic timeline (pictures, not just a list of names and dates.) We meet their need for concrete material by designing the characters for the timeline to reflect both personality and content pertaining to their significance in history. This fits right in with Dorothy Sayers’ recommendation in her essay “The Lost Tools of Learning” - “The grammar of History should consist, I think, of dates, events, anecdotes, and personalities. A set of dates to which one can peg all later historical knowledge is of enormous help later on in establishing the perspective of history. It does not greatly matter which dates: those of the Kings of England will do very nicely, provided that they are accompanied by pictures of costume, architecture, and all “every-day things,” so that the mere mention of a date calls up a strong visual presentment of the whole period.” [Italics mine] This describes our KONOS timeline to a “T”! Classical education is, at the heart, a master-teacher mentoring, or discipling, a younger student. It has to be a mentoring relationship because communication is at the core, both in terms of desired outcome and ongoing methodology. This will not happen if we plop our young ones down with a stack of notebooks and ancient stories and simply run them through a particular syllabus. It was this relational aspect coupled with a commitment to excellence that drew me to KONOS so many years ago. Time and experience have only confirmed that this is the best tool for classical education in our home. 

Linda T. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/Feb/2007 at 8:03pm
Thanks!  Just as I sent the earlier reply a message popped up from the Konos group they answered.  All is well!
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/Feb/2007 at 8:12pm
Oh Good! There is enough info on the database to keep you occupied for a long time! Enjoy!
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