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Darkling View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Darkling Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/Nov/2016 at 7:09pm
  1. What are your biggest concerns about homeschooling? Are you worried that you're not "adequate" enough to do it? That I won't teach him what he needs to "keep up" with public schools. I'm afraid that we will home school for a couple of years, something happen and when he returns to public school that he will be behind per their requirements.
  2. Are you feeling overwhelmed by all of the info out there available on the internet, at the library, etc.? If so, how are you overcoming this? YES, I walk away from the computer, take some time to digest the info I did get and try to refine my searches to narrow down what I'm looking for. But I'm still so confused with it all. My hubby suggested just buying a "kit" for the first year to get us adjusted to it. But even that has me confused, I don't want to waste money on something that my already knows (he excels at math) but have something that he isn't ready for either (reading needs major work).
  3. Why do you want to homeschool? Do your children currently attend a public school, or are you at the point of "OK, it's time for Kindergarten--do I homeschool or send them away?" My son is in public school this year and is repeating 1st grade. He hated school so much, he refused to learn at school. Over the summer me & hubby worked with him and he thrived in reading & spelling (which if failed completely the year before). We started off this year strong but in just 6 weeks he went from a 96 to a 72 in language arts.  We believe he will flourish and excel with home teaching like he did over summer break.
  4. What curriculum choices have you narrowed yourself down to as possibilities? (Or are you struggling to narrow it down in the first place?) I want to teach him all the basics (reading, writing, spelling, math, history, science, etc), but we also want to add in other areas like computer coding, life skills (managing a budget, etc.) and others.   Of course all of this on an age appropriate time. Like I won't teach him basic car maintenance at 8 years old but will teach him how to read a recipe and what is healthy choices in foods.
  5. What homeschooling method/style appeals to you the most and why? A schedule to help us set limits and goals but also eclectic because if an event or opportunity comes along we turn it into a day of learning field trip of sorts. My husband is a computer engineer and there are all kinds of events that come up. We are also part of the Emergency Management in our county so weather alert classes and disaster training opportunities also come up.
  6. Do you have special needs that need addressing? (Don't forget we have a whole forum dedicated to Special Needs homeschooling!) Not really. The schools "labeled" him as ADHD but I don't believe it to be so. With the right kind of teaching, like we did over the summer, he learned quickly and didn't have the issues that he did last year in school with talking, playing, not listening, not working, basically everything that a kid normally does.  Also I was diagnosed with cancer this year and have completed all my treatments (so far cancer free) which is why I'm now a stay-at-home mom again. I do forget things and will need help in curriculum building.
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nat47 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nat47 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10/Dec/2016 at 5:28pm
I joined a really great homeschool group for Texas on Facebook a few weeks ago that talked a lot about the school choice issues.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tlcknits Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/Feb/2017 at 8:47pm
I know this post is a little old, but I am just getting started in some research about potentially homeschooling my daughter next fall-she will be in 9th grade, and I saw this and the questions seemed very appropriate.

  1. What are your biggest concerns about homeschooling? Are you worried that you're not "adequate" enough to do it?              I do worry that I am not adequate to teach her, how do I get through this.
  2. Are you feeling overwhelmed by all of the info out there available on the internet, at the library, etc.? If so, how are you overcoming this?              There is a lot of information out there and I have become overwhelmed trying to figure out what is 
  3. Why do you want to homeschool? Do your children currently attend a public school, or are you at the point of "OK, it's time for Kindergarten--do I homeschool or send them away?"           My daughter currently attends a public school in the biggest city in our state and my biggest reason for wanting to homeschool is the size of the classes in our public school.  I don't want her to become just a number/get lost and then get behind/start failing.  We went through that a couple of years ago.  I have also tossed around the idea of having her do core classes at home, and take some of her electives (such as choir, etc) at the public school so that she can stay connected with her friends and take part in activities such as show choir and athletics.  Any advice about that?
  4. What curriculum choices have you narrowed yourself down to as possibilities? (Or are you struggling to narrow it down in the first place?)            I am struggling to narrow it down.  There are so many out there.
  5. What homeschooling method/style appeals to you the most and why?               I am not sure what appeals most, I am not sure what all styles there are.  Can you explain?
  6. Do you have special needs that need addressing? (Don't forget we have a whole forum dedicated to Special Needs homeschooling!)                   My daughter has an anxiety disorder and has high functioning autism.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brownjulie74 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20/Mar/2017 at 7:17pm
Hi Tasha,

We are preparing to homeschool our three kids for the 17/18 school year. They'll be in 3rd, 4th and 6th grades. We live in Texas, but we are planning on doing a LOT of traveling in the next year, and at the end of the year we will not be returning to Texas, but relocating to New England. The free public school program is too restrictive for us and doesn't address our reasons for wanting to pull the kids (one GT student who's bored; one with depression, OCD and anxiety who struggles with the ridiculous emphasis on standardized testing; and the flexibility of doing our own thing), and the private online homeschool programs are prohibitively expensive. If we choose a curriculum on our own, how do I know if it meets the standards of the state we're currently in AND the state we will move to? With the Texas State programs, if we move before the end of the school year, we have to abandon our homeschool curriculum and enroll them in a school or a new program in our new state. We would like to avoid that for obvious reasons. How do we pick a curriculum? How do you know which ones are good, and how likely is it that it may not satisfy all of the state requirements? I don't know if it matters or not, but we are looking for a secular curriculum. Also, I'm assuming that once we purchase a 4th grade program, for example, that we will be able to pass it down to our third grader next year, correct? Can you still do that if a portion or majority of the program is online?

Secondly, I don't know how much "teaching" these programs require on my part. I am confident that I could capably teach any of the material, but I am also pretty confident that I wouldn't be able to teach all three grade levels concurrently. That sounds incredibly daunting. If the programs are more self directed and require me to guide them rather than teach them, I'm sure I could handle that. Any advice you may have to a complete newbie who doesn't even know how to start would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Julie
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HomeofLove4Him Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/Apr/2017 at 1:38am
Hi Julie! 

First, kudos on your decision to pull the kids out of school and homeschool them. Your reasons (GT child, one with depression and one with OCD/anxiety) are quite common reasons for pulling children out of the traditional school setting. I myself suffer from depression, OCD, and anxiety. Actually, the depression is part of why I haven't been as active on the forum lately. For that, I apologize but I hope you'll understand. 

Second, the best thing I'd say to do would be to keep tabs on the requirements of where you're traveling and, yes, let those be your guidelines as to how you'll homeschool. If you have at least some plan of where you plan to live, you'll have the advantage of looking ahead of time and making sure that you're in compliance. I'd steer clear from states that are extremely restrictive. *shrug* 

Also, check out Roadschooling and what those families do! Roadschooling is a term used to describe homeschooling on the road...but it's also used to describe RV-living families who homeschool. 

I tend to go for Christian curricula, but secular is obviously fine as well. Wink So, choose curricula that you'll be able to use from state-to-state and, again, stay away from states that are extremely restrictive. But you know, you may have heard about "red states" (based on HSLDA's map that shows which states have the most restrictions). Stay away from the red states...but also, get in contact with the unschoolers in those states and they'll let you know how they manage to unschool while staying within state guidelines. If unschoolers can do it, then you certainly can do it!! 

AFA passing curriculum down -- it all depends on what you're using. If you're using an online program, I'd think the answer to that would be "no"...just from the nature of the program. We use a Christian online program (Monarch by AOP/Alpha-Omega)...but a GREAT secular online program I'd recommend would be Time4Learning. I have 4 children who are old enough to be in school and my 5th child is only 2 months old. So, while I'm in my 14th year of homeschooling, this is my 1st time homeschooling with a newborn. Online schooling has saved my sanity and our homeschooling. We may or may not do it forever but for NOW, it's what's working. You'll find that homeschooling is a lot about what's working NOW and not necessarily "forever." 

Hope that helps some? :) :)

~Tasha
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HomeofLove4Him Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/Apr/2017 at 6:08pm
HI Darkling!

I had a VERY long post typed out to you but I guess since I left the forum site open for a long time, it wouldn't let me post my reply when I hit "Post Reply." So, I'm going to try repeating what I'd written in a concise manner. Sigh.... Dumb computer! LOL

1) Please do not worry that you won't teach him what he needs to know...and please do not enter homeschooling expecting to fail. As I said in my post that didn't post, if you're truly concerned about "keeping up," just find out what standards your school adheres to (Common Core for instance) and make sure that whatever program you're using adheres to the same standards. As for me, I don't worry about Common Core or any state standards. Instead, I just know that the curriculum we're using is RIGOROUS and frankly, tougher than I would be if I were doing all the teaching myself. We use an online Christian program called Monarch (by AOP/Alpha-Omega). See their banner ad to the right of this message >>>> 

2) Well, to an extent, I agree with your hubby. Go with a program that provides a teacher's guide for each subject and/or that covers everything you need. I would piece it together myself...meaning, instead of purchasing the "4th grade kit" or whatever, purchase whatever grade level you need for each subject. That way, your "kit" will be customized. :) 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HomeofLove4Him Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/Apr/2017 at 6:16pm
Hi there tlcknits, 

I'm sorry I'm just now seeing this post but I wanted to answer you still and try to help. Embarrassed

1) I think the only way to truly get through feeling inadequate is to actually get into it and DO IT. Then you'll boost your confidence and you'll know you can do it. :) 

2) What, specifically, are you trying to figure out? 

3) Sounds like a typical reason to homeschool! :) AFA participating in activities at the public school...that's going to totally depend on the state you're in and the laws of the state. For instance, here in FL, public schools are required--by law--to allow homeschoolers to participate in extra-curricular activities. The only requirements are that the homeschooled students must adhere to the same grade requirements (like maintaining a C average) to participate. 

4) You're right about that! :)

5) Homescholing "styles" just means the way you homeschool. For instance, some people are more traditional and prefer to have a schedule and use textbooks......while at the other end of the spectrum are people who don't use curriculum at all. That's what's meant by "style." :) 

6) I would bet that her anxiety disorder is definitely impacted by having a huge classroom. :( 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote elliemaejune Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/Apr/2017 at 9:36pm
Originally posted by brownjulie74 brownjulie74 wrote:

Hi Tasha,

We are preparing to homeschool our three kids for the 17/18 school year. They'll be in 3rd, 4th and 6th grades. We live in Texas, but we are planning on doing a LOT of traveling in the next year, and at the end of the year we will not be returning to Texas, but relocating to New England. The free public school program is too restrictive for us and doesn't address our reasons for wanting to pull the kids (one GT student who's bored; one with depression, OCD and anxiety who struggles with the ridiculous emphasis on standardized testing; and the flexibility of doing our own thing), and the private online homeschool programs are prohibitively expensive. If we choose a curriculum on our own, how do I know if it meets the standards of the state we're currently in AND the state we will move to? With the Texas State programs, if we move before the end of the school year, we have to abandon our homeschool curriculum and enroll them in a school or a new program in our new state. We would like to avoid that for obvious reasons. How do we pick a curriculum? How do you know which ones are good, and how likely is it that it may not satisfy all of the state requirements? I don't know if it matters or not, but we are looking for a secular curriculum. Also, I'm assuming that once we purchase a 4th grade program, for example, that we will be able to pass it down to our third grader next year, correct? Can you still do that if a portion or majority of the program is online?

Secondly, I don't know how much "teaching" these programs require on my part. I am confident that I could capably teach any of the material, but I am also pretty confident that I wouldn't be able to teach all three grade levels concurrently. That sounds incredibly daunting. If the programs are more self directed and require me to guide them rather than teach them, I'm sure I could handle that. Any advice you may have to a complete newbie who doesn't even know how to start would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Julie


I am also in Texas. :-)

Which "Texas state program" are you talking about? Did you mean Texas Virtual Academy? That is a Texas-based public charter school, so of course if you moved out of Texas you would not be able to keep your children enrolled in it. :-)

There are no states which have "standards" that homeschoolers must meet. Some states require standardized testing, but that's not usually a problem for most homeschoolers. Also, most states do not require that your instructional materials be approved in any way. You get to choose what works for you.

A good place to start researching is Cathy Duffy's site. Many of her reviews are Christian materials, but not all of them. Also, there are a number of good books about homeschooling that would help you decide what to do; The Well Trained Mind is one.

Most homeschoolers are teaching more than one child at home, so it is not as daunting as you might think. How much of your time is involved depends on what you're teaching.

I would strongly recommend that you look for local homeschoolers to meet with and discuss things. Texas Home Educators has a good number of support groups on its sites; perhaps there will be one close to you.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HomeofLove4Him Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/Apr/2017 at 3:47am
Originally posted by Mommy.of5 Mommy.of5 wrote:

Let me start off by saying I am so happy I found this forum!!! I was ( well, still am, but not as bad) so overwhelmed by all the options I have for home schooling. Even after reading on here I still don't even know where to start. I have a 10yro son who is currently enrolled in 5th grade in a public school. I have never homes schooled before and I am on a tight budget so I want the most cost effective way without taking away from the quality of the education he receives. I also need to make sure everything coincides with the state curriculum so he will pass his test to move on to the next grade. Where do I start? Also best advice for a child with a mild attention disorder, not bad enough to need medication, but he needs constant supervision or he loses focus VERY  easily.

Hi Mommyof5! 

First, welcome! ClapClap

Second, where to start (because, yes, it IS very overwhelming...but that's kind of a good thing--it means there are plenty of options out there!): 

1) Find out what your state's requirements are. You can find this at HSLDA's website or by Googling "homeschooling laws in ____ ." I see you're in TN and from what I am aware, TN is pretty lenient on homeschooling. So, chances are that whatever curriculum or homeschooling style you choose will be perfectly fine with TN state. 

2) Find out IF he's even required to take state tests in TN. Are you sure that homeschoolers are required to do that? I'm asking b/c I know of some homeschoolers in TN who would flip their lids at the thought of taking government-mandated tests...so double check on that. You may not even be required to take state tests in TN. 

3) Decide which subjects you want to teach directly and which subjects you could use some help in. For me, for example, I TOTALLY need help in teaching Math. Not that I can't teach it or anything but I have 4 children who are homeschooling (my 5th is only 2 months old), so trying to teach Math to 4 diff't kids would drive me batty. So, that's one subject I use an online program for that not only teaches but also grades it. I pretty much have nothing to do with their Math unless I check in on them, yet they do Math every day and have quizzes and tests when the program dictates it. It's FANTASTIC. We use Teaching Textbooks for Math. 

4) Decide which homeschooling style best suits you. If you're unfamiliar with homeschooling styles, Google things such as "traditional homeschooler," "Charlotte Mason homeschooling," "unschooling," and "eclectic homeschooling" to get you started. 

5) Dive into it, feet first! :) 

LMK if I can answer any further questions! 

~Tasha
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HomeofLove4Him Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/Apr/2017 at 3:50am
Originally posted by elliemaejune elliemaejune wrote:

Originally posted by brownjulie74 brownjulie74 wrote:

Hi Tasha,

We are preparing to homeschool our three kids for the 17/18 school year. They'll be in 3rd, 4th and 6th grades. We live in Texas, but we are planning on doing a LOT of traveling in the next year, and at the end of the year we will not be returning to Texas, but relocating to New England. The free public school program is too restrictive for us and doesn't address our reasons for wanting to pull the kids (one GT student who's bored; one with depression, OCD and anxiety who struggles with the ridiculous emphasis on standardized testing; and the flexibility of doing our own thing), and the private online homeschool programs are prohibitively expensive. If we choose a curriculum on our own, how do I know if it meets the standards of the state we're currently in AND the state we will move to? With the Texas State programs, if we move before the end of the school year, we have to abandon our homeschool curriculum and enroll them in a school or a new program in our new state. We would like to avoid that for obvious reasons. How do we pick a curriculum? How do you know which ones are good, and how likely is it that it may not satisfy all of the state requirements? I don't know if it matters or not, but we are looking for a secular curriculum. Also, I'm assuming that once we purchase a 4th grade program, for example, that we will be able to pass it down to our third grader next year, correct? Can you still do that if a portion or majority of the program is online?

Secondly, I don't know how much "teaching" these programs require on my part. I am confident that I could capably teach any of the material, but I am also pretty confident that I wouldn't be able to teach all three grade levels concurrently. That sounds incredibly daunting. If the programs are more self directed and require me to guide them rather than teach them, I'm sure I could handle that. Any advice you may have to a complete newbie who doesn't even know how to start would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Julie


I am also in Texas. :-)

Which "Texas state program" are you talking about? Did you mean Texas Virtual Academy? That is a Texas-based public charter school, so of course if you moved out of Texas you would not be able to keep your children enrolled in it. :-)

There are no states which have "standards" that homeschoolers must meet. Some states require standardized testing, but that's not usually a problem for most homeschoolers. Also, most states do not require that your instructional materials be approved in any way. You get to choose what works for you.

A good place to start researching is Cathy Duffy's site. Many of her reviews are Christian materials, but not all of them. Also, there are a number of good books about homeschooling that would help you decide what to do; The Well Trained Mind is one.

Most homeschoolers are teaching more than one child at home, so it is not as daunting as you might think. How much of your time is involved depends on what you're teaching.

I would strongly recommend that you look for local homeschoolers to meet with and discuss things. Texas Home Educators has a good number of support groups on its sites; perhaps there will be one close to you.

I just wanted to say that I LOVED elliemaejune's reply much better than my own reply!! Everything she said is true and she made homeschooling sound so much more do-able than I probably did. Please listen to her post! 

~Tasha
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Hello Tasha and everyone :) 

I want to thank you for any guidance and assistance you can give me! I've been spending days reading when life slows down to learn the IN laws for homeschooling, reading different things throughout the forum that pertain to me in the littlest bit that send me off on a search, and my two daughters (graduated and 14-finishing 8th grade) are part way through a defense course my work offered free through the county sherriff's office.

  1.  I've not homeschooled since my 2 that graduated were in grade school and only through third grade. 9th is a whole other game that I do NOT feel prepared for and I still haven't read a good game plan how to help her towards college.
  2. I have been reading much, beginning with the DOE for IN but that did not get me very far. lol At least I know what they don't expect from me and that my daughter does not have to take ISTEP, to which she's joyful for once.
  3. My daughter, 14-8th grade, has been in public school all her life. At the end of the school year, she shared how her algebra teacher introduced himself (she has struggled all year in this class-got her a tutor in college who says my daughter is doing college level algebra!) as not having a heart, it is a black hole, what the class had heard about him is true and worse. She is battling depression (Christian counseling and saw dr)-the kids at school yell and shove each other, scream and call each other names in gym, teachers do nothing to teach sportsmanship and they nor parents-manners and respect for many. She goes to school dreading it and comes home more depressed, disliking her peers for their behavior. She and I have made the decision to homeschool...just need to figure out how and what to use! :)
  4. Honestly, this is the most difficult choice imo because she's going in to 9th grade and wants to go on to college, possibly for psychology. I also have read, but am not clear on obtaining a diploma (not GED) when homeschooling. Is it expensive? As a single, full time mom (job starts early, she sleeps in a bit when possible and older sister doesn't start work till later so she's not home alone very long-no family in the state) on a missionary budget, can someone point me in a good direction, please?
  5. I read about unschooling, watched the video and really liked it. I think that and maybe a little relaxed style would work very well for my daughter. She has is always looking things up that interests her and has a passion for music, as well.
  6. I've read about HSLDA for homeschoolers...is joining such things beneficial?
I know I need 180 days of instruction, attendance record, and instruction equivalence to satisfy the state and to notify the principal in writing so she isn't considered truant. Any idea if that is a one time notification?

Again, thank you for any and all help!
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Hi All4JC! :) 

First, welcome to the forum and to homeschooling in general! We're so glad you're here. 

Second, I first read your post as though you were emphasizing "IN" (as in...in and out) and wondered what the "in" laws were as opposed to the "out" laws and why you'd want to follow any "out" laws in the first place. I probably need sleep... lol. 

Third, I'll try to answer your questions as best as I can. :) 

#1 - You're right, 9th grade IS a whole different ball game...but honestly, it's not all that much different from 3rd, except now you'll want to start keeping a transcript. How do you do that? Here are some great videos to get you started: https://www.hslda.org/highschool/videos.asp Also, we use a program called Homeschool Tracker where I can keep track of grades, log attendance, run reports (report cards, progress reports, and even create our transcript). Here's the link to that, which you may want to consider signing up for: homeschooltracker.com I'll warn you, it seems kinda complicated to navigate and figure out, but once you've done a few things on the site, it's not that difficult. I WANTED to love it, so I sought help (by emailing the company to ask about a few things I couldn't figure out how to do) and they were super helpful and fast at replying. So that helped me keep the program, too. 

HSLDA (more on them below) has some great information on what to expect when withdrawing kids from public school. Click on "My state" at this link: https://www.hslda.org/landingpages/withdrawing-from-public-school.asp

#2 - Yay!! :) 

#3 - This is very sad (about the Algebra teacher and the way your daughter feels), but I'm glad to see you're doing what you can to help her by getting her out of that situation. I feel it's a myth that kids "need" to "learn to deal" with stuff like that. That's baloney. No, it needs to not happen in the first place but when it does happen, it needs to be dealt with. Since the school doesn't want to deal with it, YOU will deal with it by removing her from the situation. Kudos. :) 

#4 - Obtaining a diploma isn't that expensive. You just order one online and it's delivered to your home. That's all there is to that. The question is... what does the college she wants to attend consider acceptable? THAT is what you want to look at. Now that she's starting high school next year, you want to look at this from the other direction. In the past, you've been looking from the beginning toward the end. Now you want to start and the end and look backward, so to speak. Start at the end (college) and look backward at what's required to get there....then see to it that you meet those requirements. That's really all there is to that. :) Pretty simple, actually. 

#5 - I definitely recommend following her interests, though you may or may not be able to do that 100%. Do people unschool and graduate their children? Absolutely. All the time. Filling out the transcript requires assigning grades, though, so you'd have to be subjective in determining what grade your child earned in each subject. Be honest and don't claim to have an Algebra credit (which = 150 hours spent doing a subject) if your child spent 30 minutes looking at an Algebra book one time three years ago--y'know? :) Common sense and honesty here... lol 

In the meantime, I HIGHLY suggest getting Rebecca's newest book The Summertime Survival Guide for Parents: How to Create a Summer of Wonder, Discovery and Fun! for this summer. It will prepare you for what homeschooling is like for SURE! Right now, it's only $9.95 on Amazon! Here's the link: http://amzn.to/2qNGdGS

#6 - We've never joined HSLDA, but YES, joining their program can absolutely be beneficial, especially if you live in a state that's not very homeschooling friendly. You don't have to join HSLDA to benefit from their online resources (like the link I shared above which was full of videos and info on homeschooling in the high school years). You may have noticed that that link came from HSLDA. That's because though we've never been a member, I knoooooow they know their stuff and are an excellent resource. 

That said, I used their site to look up some information on homeschooling in Indiana for you and here's what I found: https://www.hslda.org/hs101/IN.aspx?State=IN Scroll down to "Complying with Indiana’s homeschool law" for the summed up version of the law. 

As for the truancy thing...as far as I know, yes, that is a one-time thing. But, you aren't actually withdrawing her since she technically hasn't started high school yet--right? So...wouldn't it be just that you aren't going to enroll her in high school in the first place? I know here in FL, we have two main options for homeschooling. Either A) enroll through the county as a homeschooler (in which case, we have to maintain a portfolio, have an annual evaluation, and teach for 180 days)...or B) enroll in an umbrella school (in which case we're considered private school students and the requirements of what we "must" do vary based on the umbrella). In our umbrella, we only have to report attendance of 180 days (which takes about 30 seconds every 3 months). 

That is all. 

Indiana might have a similar option. :)

Let me know if I can be of further assistance to you! :) 

~Tasha




Edited by HomeofLove4Him - 14/May/2017 at 1:47am
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elliemaejune View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote elliemaejune Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2017 at 3:37pm
Originally posted by Mommy.of5 Mommy.of5 wrote:

Let me start off by saying I am so happy I found this forum!!! I was ( well, still am, but not as bad) so overwhelmed by all the options I have for home schooling. Even after reading on here I still don't even know where to start. I have a 10yro son who is currently enrolled in 5th grade in a public school. I have never homes schooled before and I am on a tight budget so I want the most cost effective way without taking away from the quality of the education he receives. I also need to make sure everything coincides with the state curriculum so he will pass his test to move on to the next grade. Where do I start? Also best advice for a child with a mild attention disorder, not bad enough to need medication, but he needs constant supervision or he loses focus VERY  easily.


You need to know the laws in your state, because to a certain extent, that will determine some of our recommendations. If you tell us which state you live in, we can refer you to resources where you can find out the laws. :-)

As long as you are homeschooling, there is no test to determine if he should move on to the next grade. There may be required testing in your state, which is why you need to know the laws, but of course your son will be promoted at the end of the year.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brownjulie74 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/May/2017 at 6:48pm
Thank you! That helps. :-)
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